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Bring Back Our Girls

Demonstrations+are+held+in+Nigeria+and+the+U.S.+alike+to+return+the+missing+girls.
Demonstrations are held in Nigeria and the U.S. alike to return the missing girls.

Demonstrations are held in Nigeria and the U.S. alike to return the missing girls.

charismanews.com

charismanews.com

Demonstrations are held in Nigeria and the U.S. alike to return the missing girls.

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All over the United States, parents cheer their children across the stage at graduation, wishing them the best in the bright futures ahead of them. Nearly 7,000 miles away, parents weep for the 200 teenage daughters whose fates they may never know.

On April 14, almost 300 girls were snatched by a terrorist group from a boarding school in a northern Nigerian town. The militants loaded the girls onto trucks in the middle of the night and disappeared into a forest bordering a state near the town. The terrorists, known as Boko Haram, have had problems with the way the government has handled local issues for a long time. It is believed that they wanted to make a statement and have their beliefs put into law. One of those beliefs is that education, especially for females, should be outlawed.

The Nigerian government has kept its attempts to find the girls quiet for the most part but police have offered a reward of $310,000 for their return. Despite these efforts and assurances made by government officials, citizens of the town, Chibok, and surrounding areas are in an uproar over the lack of action made to find the girls. Their outrage has caught fire and spread all the way to the United States.

The movement was put into place by a Nigerian lawyer tweeting with the tag #BringBackOurGirls to express his dissatisfaction toward the government’s methods of dealing with the mass kidnapping. His tweet launched a campaign that settled heavily in the hearts of people all over the world. Supporters began to spread the message internationally: forming protests and organizations to help return the missing girls to their families. President and First Lady Obama have shown their support for the campaign and advisers from the United States and Britain have been sent to assist with the rescue.

A handful of girls have been returned, but even over a month after the kidnappings more than 200 are still missing. However, the girls’ families hold out hope that their girls will return one day and carry on with the futures that were once so bright.

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The official student publication since 1918
Bring Back Our Girls